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CONTENTS 1 


ffP^I* "" History 


page 2 


^ Queens .^^.^.^ vaae 10 


, X' *:,;,, Seniors ^«*'^* 


^^age^22 


^^^^^ Greeks .^M 


^page 48 


^^^ Student Life 


page 58 


W^ " ^ Sports 


page 78 


^^^^^ 0^^dication 


page 100 


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Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2010 with funding from 

Lyrasis IVIembers and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/hawk1980univ 




UMES, formally known as Maryland State College, was founded in 1886. 
Its first classes were held in a colonial type building called Olney. Built in 
1 798 by Ezekial Haynie, the building stood in the center of the campus for 
many years. It was said to have been the oldest building on any campus for 
black students during that time. 



In 1886 the first thirty-seven students came to Olney. They brought with 
them not only an eagerness and enthusiasm to learn but a definite desire to 
improve the school and the surrounding grounds. From the time they arrived, 
they were immediately set to making repairs on Olney. 



4\|-*-; ^■ 



The first teachers of Olney were 
Benjamin O. Bird, who was prin- 
cipal, his wife Portia and an assis- 
tant, Jacob C. Dunn. For many years 
the Birds and Dunn worked 
faithfully for the school and the sur- 
rounding community. In 1897 Bird 
died and was buried on the campus 
after his funeral services, which 
were held at Metropolitan Methodist 
Church right in Princess Anne. 





In 1940 Crystal Bird Fauset, 
daughter of Benjamin Bird, and a 
former member of the Pennsylvania 
Legislature, dedicated a new 
mechanic arts building in memory of 
her father. That building still stands 
and is known as Bird Hall. The con- 
struction of this building and two 
other buildings was financed by 
Federal funds. 




UMES has had several names throughout its histon;, all of which seem to 
reflect the types of programs offered at the school or the type of programs under 
which the school was run, names such as the Industrial Branch of Morgan 
College, Delaware Conference Academy, Princess Anne Academy and many 
others. 

During its early years of existence, most of the financial aid of the school came 
from various Methodist Conferences. However, most of the financial support after 
1900 came from Federal land-grant funds under the Morrill Acts and the Nelson 
Amendments. 

By 1936 the school had transformed from high school to college. This major 
change was brought about by Frank J. Trigg and Thomas Kiah. Trigg served as 
principal from 1902 until 1910. He was successful at gaining the Academy high 
recognition and thus placing it among the better black schools of that time. A 
native of the Eastern Shore, Kiah served as Principal from 1910 until 1930. Dur- 
ing his years as principal, the role of the Academy as high school was eclisped by 
the development of public secondary education. However, due to the increase of 
free public education in Maryland the enrollment after World War I dropped 
tremendously and continued to decline in the years that followed. 




In an effort to combat the rising com- 
petition from public schools, Kiah in- 
stituted a junior college program. Not 
bringing in the desired results, this 
program was terminated and a full fledged 
four year college was to be formed. But 
there again was the problem of finances 
and World War H also played its part in 
slowing down the enrollment. 

Shortly after the end of World War II a 
major program was instituted. It was 
designed to revolutionize college life. This 
development was the major turning point 
in the building of a very prominent four 
year college program. 





In 1947 Maryland State had such low prestige with very little or no recognition as 
a college that the Higher Education in Maryland Survey recommended that the 
college be abolished. In addition, the publicity given to the survey's recommendation 
by several prominent newspapers of that time left little hope for the continuation of 
Maryland State. 

There was much turmoil all over the campus. Whites and blacks alike were in fact 
strongly against the continuation of Maryland State and gave no support to the of- 
ficials of the school that were trying to encourage its survival. 

Finally on December 17, 1947, the Legislative Council met to decide if there was 
any need for further existence of the college. When the council decided on the con- 
tinuation of Maryland State, it received hardly any support. Along with this, the 
governor of Maryland, in his inaugural address stated that there would be no in- 
crease in funds for the school until an actual decision had been made as to whether 
the school would or would not be terminated. It was then, in an attempt to save the 
college, that the black citizens of the Eastern Shore Counties banded together to 
form the Eastern Shore Citizens Association. In one attempt to save the college, the 
Association sent 750 people to Annapolis to explain to the governor the need and the 
desire of the Eastern Shore to have the programs of the school continued and im- 
proved. 





In the years that followed as before, the need for continuation of the school was 
continually discussed. Since the school was now under the administration of College 
Park, there was always the question of whether the college could meet the standards 
of the College Park Campus. 

In 1957 the state legislature made the first clear cut appropriation of funds for new 
buildings and programs on the campus. The institution would live and there was no 
question concerning the accreditation of the college because of the State's Associa- 
tion's decision to approve full accreditation of Maryland State. Maryland State con- 
tinued to blossom and grew with new programs, buildings and ideas. 

On July 1, 1970 Maryland State College officially became the University of 
Maryland Eastern Shore or as it is more commonly known UMES. 

Today ten years later UMES is ever progressing and improving. And as always, it 
has the support of teachers, administrators and most importantly the students, 
without whom there would be no institution. 

As we look back on years gone by, we see that we have come a mighty long way. 
Yet, we are not where we could be or should be. The fight is not over yet and we the 
student body, faculty and administration must work together now to make UMES an 
institution capable of meeting the challenges of tomorrow. 



Famous Black Leaders Who 
Have Visited Over The Years 
Not Pictured: 

Authur Ashe — Tennis Pro 
Stokley Carmicheal — 

Black Leader 
Shirley Chisholm — 

Congress Woman 
Ozie Davis — Actor 
Ruby Dee — Actress 
Langston Hughes — Author 
Coretta Scott King — 

Black Leader 
Art Tatun — Pianist 
Ethel Waters — Actress 
Andrew Young — 

Former Ambassador of (iJV. 



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Duke Ellington 
Orchestra Leader 



Ella Fitzgerald 
Singer 






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Miss University of Maryland Eastern Shore 




1980 
SHARON ELLIOTT 



ROYAL COURT 




MISS FRESHMAN 
KIM JACKSON 



MISS SOPHOMORE 
TOREYHALL 




MISS SENIOR 
JANICE GRIFFITH 



MISS HAWK 
DOROTHY SNOWDEN 




MISS ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA 
RETHA MILBOURNE 




MISS ALPHA PHI ALPHA 
SANDRA WRIGHT 




MISS ART 
TANYA EDWARDS 



MISS BASKETBALL 
TANZA ALFRED 




MISS CALENDAR GIRL 
JEAN CARTER 



MISS CHEERLEADER 
GWENDOLYN BROWN 




MISS CLEFTER 
CATHERINE CHRISTMAS 



MISS COMMUTER 
DONNA HYTCHE 




MISS GAMMA SIGMA SIGMA 
DENISE HARRIS 





MISS GAMMA PHI OMEGA 
PAMELA WOODSON 




MISS GROOVE PHI GROOVE 
DENISE PUMPHREY 



MISS HOME ECONOMICS 
ANITA HAIRSTON 





MISS INDUSTRIAL EDUCATION 
JOAN LEE 



MISS NATURAL SCIENCES 
PATRICIA FINNEY 




MISS OMEGA PSI PHI 
MONIQUE SPAULDING 



MISS PEP 
LISA SCOTT 




MISS PHI BETA LAMBDA 
JULIETTE WALKER 




MISS PHI BETA SIGMA 
LILLIAN COUNTEE 




MISS PHYSICAL EDUCATION 
DIANE HOLLOWAY 



MISS ZETA PHI BETA 
CYNTHIA HARRIS 



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22 




Gail Aiken 



Samuel A. Akinleye 



Mohammad D. Assadi 



Clarence Benjamin 



Kim Ashcraft 




Viola Bivens 




Catherine A. Chapman 



Mary B. Copeland 



Reverend Crockett 



Seniors 23 




Lewis Dale 



Karen A. Douglass 




Cassandra B. Edwards 




Sabrina E. Edwards 



Sharon V. Elliott 



Michael Farrare 




Bart M. Griffin 



Janice Griffin 



Anita M. Hairston 



24 Seniors 




Carl E. Hardaway 



Leonard Harmon 



Cynthia A. Harris 




Denise A. Harris 



Ida L. Harris 



Maryham Hedayati 




Doris Henson 



Sharon Holden 



Tyvolia Holden 



Seniors 25 




Kenneth Hooper 



Kevin D. Hughson 




Ronald Jenkins 



Janice Johnson 



WHliam P. tfytche, Jr. 





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Leon W. Jones 




Sharon Jones 



Robert Kennedy 



John Lane 



26 Seniors 




Gail P. Lee 



Judy McKenzie 



Helen R. Messick 



Ritha M. Milboume 



Tob\; D. Madison 




Benjamin Jti. Mullins, Jr. 




Barbara Murray 



Glenda M. Neal 



Mrs. Okki 



Seniors 27 



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Dorina A. Shelton 



Glenda Jones Sinclair 



Zen Pham 




Gary M. Stewart 




Mohammad A. Tabib 



James Tilghman, Jr. 



Cathy Warren 



28 Seniors 




Victoria Wells 



Donald E. West 



Lee West 




Seniors 29 



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CLASS 
OF 

80 





30 



CHANCELLOR 




DR. WILLL^M P. 
HYTCHE 



31 





32 



JUNIORS 




DERRICK 
ANDERSON 



EDWARD 
BOONE 




BRYANT 
COLEMAN 




■li #■ 




EUPHMO 
ARNOLD 



GWENDOLYN 
BROWN 



SUSAN 
BARTON 



JAMES 
BROWN 



MILTON 
BLUm 




BERNARD 
CLINTON 



DARNISE 
HENRY 




KEEBLER 
HOLLEY 



JERRY 
JONES 



Underclassmen 33 




ZINNIE 
JONES 



GINA 
MARSHALL 



:iliti' I 




JOAN 
LEE 



HANNAH 
MARTIN 



BERT 
NWOSU 



ARLENE 
PERKINS 



BRENDA 
McGEE 



JANICE 
MARTIN 



LYNN 
SHAW 




ABBEY 
MARSHALL 




MARVIN 
MOSELY 




EARL 
SHOCKLEY 




GREGG 
STEWART 



VANESSA 
THORTON 



DAVID 
WARE 



EARL 
WASHINGTON 



34 




FLOYD 
BLACKEJT 



SAMUEL 
PARKER 



35 




RODRICK 

HINMAN 



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CORNELLIA 
JOHNSON 



CAROLYN 
HOLLOWAY 



RENARD 
LESESNE 



GLENN 
HOLMES 



GARY 
MASSEY 



GRAYSON 
JACKSON 




CAROLYN 
McKEEVER 




ZACCHEAS 
RODRIGUES 



ROYLETTE 
SMITH 



MICHAEL 
STEWART 



LEO 
HAIRSTON 





DEBBIE 
WILKERSON 




EUGENE 
WILLIAMS 



'\ P 



TROY 
McMILLIAN 



JAMES 
WILLOUGHBY 





Jungle Taste 

Edward S. Silvera 

There is a coarseness 

In the songs of black men. 

Coarse as the songs 

Of the sea. 

There is a weird strangeness 

In the songs of black men 

Which sounds not strange 

To me. 

There is beauty 

In the faces of black women. 

Jungle beauty; 

And mystery 

Dark hidden beauty 

In the faces of black women. 

Which only black men 

See. 






37 




M\RLOW 
BARKLEY 




KEI>iNETH 
BRIGGS 



MELODYE 
BATES 



HELENE 
BROWN 



ETTA 
BATTLE 




YVONNE 
CAMPBELL 



MICHAEL 
BINFORD 




CAROLYN 
CLEVELAND 




LENNY 
CLIPPER 



KIRK 
DOUGLASS 




NATHANIEL 
COLLINS 




SANDRA 
COPES 




JEFFREY 
DICKERSON 




CYNTHIA 
DYSON 



ANTHONY 
EASTERLING 



TANYA 
GALVIN 




It's yours for the 
taking 



FRESHMEN 




HAMID 
AHMADHASHEMI 



ANTHONY 
AJEGII 



THNZA 
ALFRED 



ERIC 
ALSTON 





PATRICK 
BARKLEY 



CURTIS 
BATTLE 



STUART 
BELENKER 



GERALD 
BEST 







RODNEY 
BEVERLY 



KAREN 
BLACK 



WENDY 
BLACKWELL 



VERNON 
BROWN 






RICKY 
BUTLER 



LEWIS 
CALHOUN 



WANDA 
CARTER 



MICHAEL ^ . 

CHASE 41 




STEPHANIE 
CHERRY 



ELAINE 
CHILDS 



BONNIE 
COPES 



PRAVONNE 
CROPPER 




LARRY 
DALE 



ERIC 
DAVIS 



IDA 
DAVIS 




MARTHA 
DAVIS 




STEVE 
WARNER 




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TERRI 
DYSON 



TONY 
EDWARDS 



GRETA 
ELLIOT 





GUY 
EVANS 



ESTHER 
EZZELL 



REGINA 
FELIX 



42 Underclassmen 



( 




RAYNELL 
GARRY 



BEREATHA 
GOULD 




DEBRA 
HAIRSTON 



KEVIN 
GARRISON 



JAMES 
GREEN 




MADISON 
HAIRSTON 




YVONNE 
GIDDENS 



LORRI 
GREENE 




MICHAEL 
HAIRSTON 



STARRA 
HAIRSTON 



CHRISTOPHER 
HAND 



REGINALD 
BARNES 



GERALD 
GLOSTER 




LATANYA 
FOOTE 




SOPHIA 
HAIRSTON 




ROBERT 
HARRIS 



Underclassmen 43 




SHARON Y. 
JOHNSON 



THOMAS 
JONES 



TEDDY 
KEY 



CAMILLE 
KING 





GREG 
KING 



BORIS 
KUSHEINOFF 



THOMAS 
LAVIEST 



CARLTON 
LEWIS 



44 Underclassmen 




MINA 
LUCAS 



ROCHELLE 
MALLORY 




JOHN 
MONTGOMERY 



DRUSCILLA 
PERRY 



CHERYL 
MacCRAE 



PAUL 
MATTHEWS 



JANICE 
MONTOUTH 




SYLVIA 
QUINTON 



LISA 
McAFFEE 




ALESIA 
MILLER 




DIANE 
MURPHY 




ANGELA 
RICKS 






SYLVIA 
McCALL 





THEODORA 
NEIL 




ELEANOR 
SCOTT 

Underclassmen 45 




ROBERT 
SEAGEARS 



MONIQUE 
SPAULDING 








WILLIAM 
SHORTER 



SHIRLEY 
SIMMS 



ANTOINNE 
SPENCER 



ROSANNE 
STEWART 



LLOYD 
SMTTH 





ARETHA 
SWINSON 




FABL^N 
WHTTE 



JAY 
WHTTE 



HELEN 
WILLL^MS 



JERRY 
WILLIS 



46 Underclassmen 




TRACV 
WILLIS 




DELPHINE 

wrrcHER 



MARION 
YOUNGER 




WE WEAR THE MASK 




Paul Laurence Dunbar 

We wear the mask that grins and lies. 
It hides our cheeks and shades our eyes 
This debt we pay to human guile; 
With torn and bleeding hearts we smile, 
And mouth with myriad subtleties. 

Why should the world be over-wise, 
In counting all our tears and sighs? 
Nay, Let them oMy see us, while 
We wear the mask. 




We smile, but O great Christ, our cries 
To thee from tortured souls arise. 
We sing, but oh the clay is vile 
Beneath our feet, and long the mile; 
But let the world dream otherwise. 
We wear the mask! 




47 



MEET 

THE 

GREEKS 



48 



ALPHA KAPPA ALPHA 




The Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority is committed to high 
scholastic and ethical standards; the development of un- 
ity and friendship among college women; the promotion 
of higher education, and service to all man-kind. We 
believe that people oriented programs must be geared to 
meet the real needs of the people if they are to be eflfec- 
tive and meaningfiil. We believe that Alpha Kappa Alpha 
has the trained resources, national and local stature to 
meet the challenges and make a positive impact on our 
constantly changing world. 



Greek-1 49 



DELTA SIGMA THETA 




Pictured: Carolyn Cleveland 
Sandra Copes 
Cheryl Walley 
Denise Pumphrey 

At the inception of Delta Sigma Theta in 1913 at Howard University, the Founders 
envisioned an organization of college women pledged to serious endeavor and com- 
munity service. 
Not Pictured: Dawn Bivens 

Robin Greene 

Bemadette Fisher 

Cheryl Davis 

Lee Abney Nu Rho Chapter 



50 Greek-2 



ZETA PHI BETA 




Greek 51 



ALPHA PHI ALPHA 




52 Greek 



KAPPA ALPHA PSI 




The Fraternity of Kappa Alpha Psi Inc. was chartered on 
Maryland State Campus in April of 1949. And since its charter 
Kappa Alpha Psi has had an unpresidented history of 
achievement, both on the campus and in the community. 

The Gamma Xi Chapter has established an astounding in- 
fluence within the community for its volunteer work as well as 
its national Guide Right Program. 

Kappa Alpha Psi also holds the prestigious position of be- 
ing the only Fraternity on campus that, through its 
relationship with the campus area has brought national 
recognition to the campus. 

Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity Inc. . . . another reason to be 
proud of the University of Maryland, Eastern Shore. 



Greek 53 



PHI BETA SIGMA 




PHI BETA SIGMA FRATERNITY INC. 
Founded in 1914 at Howard Universify, Phi Beta 
Sigma Fraternity is one of the most influential 
Greek-letter organizations in existence today. With 
chapters in three-continents, Phi Beta Sigma 
Fraternity Incorporated centers its ideals around 
brotherhood and cultural advancement. 

Alpha Mu Chapter 



54 



OMEGA PSI PHI 




Greek 55 



GROOVE Pm GROOVE 




56 Greek 



SIGMA ALPHA MU 




Greek 57 



STUDENT 






LIFE 





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B SBSSSSBBSSMS'*^'" 





From Left to Right: Jacqueline Booth, Victoria Cole, Judith Dickerson, 
Sophia Hairston, Wanda Vowels, Gloria Lee, Toni Evans, Patricia Wells 






^ 



Contemplating 




Art is a many mysterious thing. 




Ifs the hands, not the feet 



"The Controller^ 



Man, I've got a "REAL" date tonight 




* A£»!mm-^'fyy ,}■&£' 



"Volley you guys" 




UMES 
CONCERT CHOIR 




70 






IS 



I 



UMES DRAMA 

SOCIETY IN 

AMENS CORNER 



A SNEAK PREVIEW OF BEHIND 
THE SCENES 




You did a good job . . . yeah, but it didn't help much. 



Please, don't put too much! 




My name is Sam . . . and I am the real star of this act. 



They really messed your make-up up. 
-Oh hush! 




^^'^'^^ 



dt*' 









76 




Ms. Ella Fitzgerald, "The Queen of Jazz" has appeared fre- 
quently in concert at the University of Maryland Eastern Shore to 
benefit the Ella Fitzgerald Scholarship Fund and in appreciation 
to the University for having named the Performing Arts Center in 
her honor on October 24, 1974. 

It is a complex of 38,172 gross stpiare feet of classrooms, pram 
tice studios, offices, and a 1200 seat auditorium. 
fc Ms. Fitzgerald's latest accolade from the University was an 
honorary doctorate degree bestowed upon her during graduation 
exercises in May, 1981. 

Few women of song can outshine Ella Fitzgerald in awards and 
honors for her brilliance in music. She has received everything 
from DOWNBEATS "Best Female Jazz Singer Award" to the 
"Golden Needle Award", the highest honor ever paid an 
American artist by the East Berlin Government. 



77 






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SSlA 






San 


I Levi 




Francisco 


I Fontaine 


m 


Warriors 




Seattle 
Supersonic 




Baltimore 
Colts 



Wx 




Cleveland 
Browns 



llS^^^^Sl 




Carl 
Hairston 



Phildelphia 
Eagles 







Tyrone Smith 

First Player From UMES 

To play in the 

Black College Bowl 

Game in 1978 




»^*W«- r-T-*--*** 



HAWKS FOOTBALL 
HOMECOMING 1979 






80 



UMES FOOTBALL STAFF 








COACH: CALDWELL 




COACH: LEE 



82 





COACH: SCOTT M. 



COACH: ELLIOT 





TRAINER: M. UNZICKER 



COACH: TATE 



83 



HAWK DEFENSE 



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HAWK OFFENSE 







85 






Avon gets out of reach for Delaware State 



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Reggie Ennis breaks for a touchdown against Dei State 



86 



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Another one bites the dust 



87 



"WE CAN MAKE OUR OWN WAY" 



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i 30 



"Dorma" 




"Rosanne" 









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"Maria" 




AJL 



sy^^s 




"Latanya" 



"Gretta" 



HAWKETTES BASKETBALL 



88 



HAWKEJTES IN ACTION 




89 




BASKETBALL 
1979-80 SCHEDULE 



Universify of Maryland 

Bowie State 

Hampton Institute 

Elizabeth City St. 

Siena Heights 

Youngstown State 

LeMoyne College 

Southern Conn. State 

Washington College 

Gannon University 

Morgan State 
Hampton Institute 

Coppin State 

University ofD.C. 

Morgan State 

Delaware State 

North Carolina Central 

University ofD.C. 

Bowie State 

^rth Carolina Central 

Coppin State 

Delaware State 

Salisbury State 

Spring Garden College 

Hampton Institute 




90 





Jerry 
Carter 



Ed 
Haskins 




Bemie 
Clinton 



Vernon 
Brown 



Marlow 
Barkley 



91 



THE 



H 
A 



W 
K 



Asst. Coach 
Andrew Lee 




B 



A 



K 



B 



Head Coach "The Man" 
KirklandHall 




M 




"Mr. Communication" 
Lecounte Conway 




Hy 1 'ki 



THE CREW" 



92 




Marlow 
Barkley 





Allen 
Faulks 




Ronald 
Shelly 





Bemie 
Clinton 




Steven 
Hay 




Vernon Brown 



Jerry Carter 



Ed Haskins 



93 



CHAMPIONS 

OF THE LOYOLA HOLIDAY 

BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 




94 




THE 

HAWKS 

WILL FUNK YOU RIGHT 

ON UP! 



95 




The Saints can't stop the Hawks 44! 



A little too close for comfort 



96 




Steve Hay shocks the house 



What can you do when it counts for two? 



97 



UMES CHEERLEADERS 





These are dedicated young ladies who 
work hard to give the fans, the players as 
well as themselves enthusiasm during the 
Football and Basketball Season. 

We Thank You. 



98 




99 



DEDICATION 




MR THOMAS WILES 



100 




Nowhere in the history of 
UMES has an instructor 
shown such dedication and 
unique concern for the Uni- 
versity family. 

Through the wheeling of 
his camera, Mr. Wiles has 
captured and recorded 
forever the transitions that 
have made this University a 
landmark in the national 
records of colleges and 
universities. 

As a stallworth figure in 
his area, Mr. Wile's work 
stands as a representation of 
consistency and quality 
results. 

For these and many other 
reasons, the 1980 Yearbook 
Staff offers a silent tribute to 
a man that has on more than 
one occasion to be an in- 
spiration to us all. 



101 




Dr. Nazem Abdalla 
Lecture — Business and Economics 




Mr. Bryce Adams 
Director, Data Processing 





Dr. Brenda Anderson 




Dr. Eugene Bass 
Assistant Professor — Biology 




Mr. Buchaman 

Program Analyst 

Business Office 




Dr. Mary F. Burks 
Professor — English 




Dr. Imitaz U. Ahmad 
102 Head and Associate 



Ms. Elva F. Bums 
Instructor — Business Economics 




Sergeant Bowden 
Security Police 




Mr. Thomas W. Calnan 

Coordinator Hotel 

and Restaurant Management 




Dr. Edward W. Chapin 
Head and Assistant 
Professor — Math 




Dr. Leon Copeland 
Assistant Professor 
Industrial Education 




Dr. Leon Coursey 

Associate Prof. Physical 

Education 




Mr. John Donlan 
Assistant Professor 
Industrial Education 




Dr. Joseph Dudis 
Assistant Professor — Math 




Mr. Estes 
Maintenance Supervisor 103 




Mr. James Ewers 

Director of Admissions and 

Registration 





Dr. Helen C. Gleason 
Assistant Professor — Education 



Mr. Remo Ferrante 

Assistant Professor — English and 

Language 





Terri Grantham 
Counselor 



Dr. Herman Franklin 
104 Vice Chancellor 
of Student Affairs 




Miss Alma Gregg 
Associate Professor — Music 




Dr. Geoffrey Guest 

Head and Assistant Professor 

Social Science 




Dr. Henderson 
Director of Counseling Center 




Drivar Holmberg 
Lecture — Agriculture 




Mr. Thomas Horseman 

Lecture — Math and 

Computer Science 





Dr. William Hull, Jr. 

Associate Processor - 

Physics 




Dr. Yen-Wan Hung 

Lecture — Natural 

Science 




Dr. C. D. Ignasias 
Director Research and Grants 




Mrs. Jackson 
Office Clerk 




Ms. Ann Howard 



Mrs. Delia D. Johnson 
Lecture — English and 105 
Language 




Dr. Gerald Johnson 

Head & Professor 

Music 



Mr. Johnson 

Postage Machine 

Operator 




c^tM 



Dr. Casey Jones 
106 Head & Associate 
Professor Education 



Dr. Richard Keenan 

Assistant Professor 

English 




Ms. M. Kumelachew 

Human Ecology 

Department 




Mr. Mack 

Vice Chancellor of 

Affairs 



Ms. Elaine Lankford 
Secretary 




Dr. Erica A. Leh 
Assistant Professor 
English & Language 





I 

Reverend Kenneth Martin Sr. 

Assistant Professor 

Music 




Mr. U.S. McPherson Jr. 

Recreation Specialist 

Consultant 





Mrs. Mary S. Morris 

Assistant Professor 

Music 




Mrs. Joyce Myster 
Instructor Math 



Dr. L. Monroe-Lord 

Head & Assistant 

Professor Human 

Ecology 




Mr. John Perrine 
Lecturer — Special Education 




Mr. David Pines 

Assistant Professor 

Business & Economics 




Dr. Jack P. Pinion 

Assistant Professor 

Chemistry 



107 




Dr. Richardson 
IQo Executive Assistant 
Chancellor 



Dr. Gurbax Singh 

Associate Professor 

Physics 




Dr. Charies Smith 

Lecturer — Social 

Science 




Mr. Douglas Smith 
Lecturer Music FT 




Dr. Franklin Smith 

Head & Professor 

Agriculture 




Dr. Robert Thatcher 

Professor & Director 

Neurological Research 




Mrs. Patricia Tilhgman 
Academic Counselor 




Dr. Lehman Tomlin 

Head & Assistant 

Professor — Industrial Education 




Elizabeth Webster 
Steno-Clerk III 




Mrs. Widdowson 
Steno-Clerk III 109 




Theresa Woolforce 

Louise Giddens 

Bertha Leatherhury 

Ophelia Moses 

Vickie 
Shirley Snead 
Ralph Moses 




110 



THE 1980 

YEARBOOK 

STAFF 



1. Martha Davis — Layout Editor 

2. Sharon Y. Johnson — Layout Editor 

3. Michael Walker — Layout Editor 

4. Patricia Cleary — Copy Editor 

5. Lemuel Clinton — Sports Editor 

6. Dereck Davis — Staff 

7. Royalatte Smith — Underclassman Editor 

8. Andrea Hill — Layout Editor 

9. Gregg Mcintosh — Photographer 

10. Dorothy Waters — Advisor 

11. Thomas Wiles — Advisor, Photographer 



111 




tant in the residence halls for 3 years, 
member of the campus Judicial Board. 

Hopefully, you will enjoy this year's 
book as much as I have enjoyed working 
on it. 



Martha Davis is a native of Baltimore, 
Md. She is a sophomore at the University 
of Md., Eastern Shore with an intended 
major of Pre-Nursing. She first attended 
this University in the fall of 1979 with the 
goal of becoming a Pediatric Nurse. 
Martha hopes to continue her education at 
the University of Md. in Baltimore where 
she will spend the last two years of her un- 
dergraduate studies. Martha became a 
part of the Hawk Yearbook staff in the fall 
of 1 980. She has contributed much time 
and effort and patience to the completion 
of the 1 980 yearbook. Her inspiration and 
hard work has helped to make this year- 
book a success. 



Lemuel Bernard Clinton 

As Sports Editor of the 1980 Yearbook / 
have found the work to be hard and very 
time-consuming; however, with a good 
supportive staff, there was room for work 
and play. 

For this area of the Yearhook, organiza- 
tion of ideas, searching for sports informa- 
tion of the past, laying out pictures, and 
meeting deadlines were important aspects 
of the assignment or position. 

I soon realized, a yearbook involves a 
lot of work and no money, but one's 
reward is being a part of a finished 
product. That's one's thanks. 

As for me, I am a Hotel-Restaurant 
Management major. I am from Long 
Island (Northport), New York. After 
graduation from UMES, I plan to enter 
graduate school at Hofstra University for 
an MBA degree or Atlanta University for 
the same degree. 

My campus activities include a position 
on the Hawks' Basketball team, member 
of the Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity, assis- 




112 





Andrea Hill is a Cooperative Education 
student who works for Soil Conservation 
Service in College Park, Maryland. She is 
a Business Administration major and 
resides in Baltimore, Maryland. 

Although Andrea has had some ex- 
perience in writing articles for newspaper 
publications, she wanted some experience 
in a phase of publication that is more 
challenging. Thus when asked to be a part 
of the UMES YEARBOOK, she was more 
than delighted to accept. 

Andrea says, she has enjoyed working 
with the staff and cherishes the oppor- 
tunity of having served a worthy cause. 
For persons who always ask, "When is the 
Yearbook coming out?" She says they 
should ask, "What can I do to help speed 
up the process and the efficiency of 'OUR 
Yearbook?" 



Royalette is a native of Baltimore, Md., 
and is a sophomore here at the University 
majoring in Physical Therapy. This is 
Royalette's first year working on the year- 
book and she has found it to be a very 
rewarding experience working on the 
various sections, and especially with the 
yearbook staff. She thoroughly enjoyed 
helping to put together the underclassmen 
section. Royalette would like to wish the 
staff all the best in the future, and looks 
forward to another successful year of 
worldng on the UMES Hawk. 




113 





114 




115 




Michael Walker has always felt it would 
. be refreshing to play a meaningful role in 
extra-curricular activities. 

It was in 1979 when he decided to ac- 
cept the responsibilities of Yearbook staff 
member. According to Michael, he has not 
regretted his decision, for he has found the 
work to be exciting as well as detailed. In 
other words, it brings out the best in an 
individual. 

Michael is a Special Education major. 
He ejects to earn his degree in 1982 and 
plans to work with either exceptional 
children or children with learning 
disabilities. 



Hello. My name is Sharon Y. Johnson. I 
am a native of Washington, D.C. My 
present status at University of Md., 
Eastern Shore is a sophomore with an in- 
tended major in Business Administration. 
My position as part of the yearbook staff is 
the Layout Editor. The 1979-1980 year- 
book is an inspiration to me because I 
dedicated much of my time and effort as 
the Layout Editor and I hope you enjoy it 
as much as I did in putting it together. In 
fact, I look forward to continuing my work 
next year as part of the yearbook staff. See 
you next year! 




116 




As Editor-in-Chief of the 1980 
Yearbook, / have found the position to be 
not only challenging, but also unforget- 
table. I will always remember the frustra- 
tions, the tension, and the loyal, hard- 
working staff. If it had not been for the 
staff, I would not have made it. As I look 
back, I see it as a big challenge, but a 
pleasant one. 

I suppose one of the things that made it 
a challenge was the theme we selected, 
"UMES, 1886-1980". We chose this theme 
because we feel the institution is going 
through a period of growth and rejuvena- 
tion, due in part to our administration and 
the new attitude and approach the Board 
of Regents is taking toward this campus. 

In terms of work involved, I face a very 
rigid time schedule, that seemed almost 
impossible for the average staff. We in- 
herited the time problem from the 
previous staff, so we plunged in, and spent 
many hours on cold winter nights organiz- 
ing and laying out our material carefully. 
We wanted a historical yearbook that 
would be representative of our institution. 

Also, this project has made me realize, 
a student publication is only as effective as 
the student support it receives. This sup- 
port involves responding to appointments 
with the photographer, submitting copy as 
requested, etc. 

All in all, I enjoyed the challenge and I 
shall always be grateful to Ms. Dorothy 
Waters for her assistance and support as 
advisor. 



117 



120 



l^^<^."^^^ ^^ 




^ 



CONTENTS 



History 




Queens Wk 


» page 10' 


Seniors ^^S 


1f^gge22i 


Greeks ^ 


WBf^e48 


Student Life 


^^age 56| 


Sports 


page 78 


dedication 


page 100 


Wacuhy and 


m.... ^. mmtmmmm'iimm.,mlti: 


p Admin. ? 


M^Ml 


Yearbook 


'^^ilK^' S